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Social Sciences

Social science review and analysis goes beyond causes and effects but leads to the study and understanding of cultures, movements, motivations, and critical moments. Students gain an accurate and broad perspective of history by studying all of time, engaging in simulations and documentary projects, and examining every civilization. Students learn to apply their studies by recognizing patterns and historical trends to anticipate and understand today’s current events.

World History

This course studies major turning points that shaped the modern world. Starting with a short review of crucial events leading to the Enlightenment, the course then focuses from the late eighteenth century of Absolutism and Revolution through the present including the Russian Revolution, two World Wars, Cold War, the decolonization of Africa and the shaping of the world as we know today. Students trace the rise of political ideas and develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international relations, and relate them to their historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Students consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives. As we see history unfold, students will learn about God’s sovereignty over all of history.

U.S. History

This course is a survey of United States history from Early America with the arrival of early Native Americans to present-day events and movements. The class concurrently aims to realize God’s sovereign hand and providence throughout the course of U.S. history. From revolution to globalization, depression to unprecedented economic prosperity, the history of the United States is one example among many of God’s wisdom, power and control working amongst sinful mankind. Examinations of political institutions and behavior, public policy, social and economic change, diplomacy and international relations, and cultural and intellectual development will occur during the year-long instruction.

AP U.S. History

This is a challenging college level course that provides students an opportunity to earn college credit. Students will survey American history from Early America with the arrival of early Native Americans to present-day events and movements. Students will examine political institutions and behavior, public policy, social and economic change, diplomacy and international relations, and cultural and intellectual development. The course is designed to prepare students for the AP U.S. History exam. Additionally, students will also receive an in-depth review of God’s providence in the historical events of the United States.

American Government

This course actively connects civil government to the everyday lives of students. Some of the key issues explored are the responsibilities of government vs. individual liberty, centralized vs. localized government, and first principles vs. evolving authorization. The class will spend time studying the structure, organization, and practices of the United States government to help inspire and prepare students to be active and godly citizens.

AP US Government and Politics

This college level course explores political theory and everyday practices that direct the daily operation of the government and shape our public policy. Students will study the functions and operations of our government in preparation for the AP exam, while also considering the biblical and philosophical implications that shape our system. The objective of this course is to go beyond the basic analysis of how our government functions. Students will develop a critical understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the American political system as well as the rights and responsibilities of citizens therein.

AP European History

This college level course covers the period from 1450 to 2000 AD. All arenas of human endeavor are included: politics, economics, art & architecture, philosophy, culture, medicine, war, industry, famous persons, events and literature. The emphasis of the course is on learning the key ideas, events and people who shaped Western Civilization. Historical periods include the Renaissance, Reformation, Age of Exploration, Age of Absolutism, Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution & Napoleon, the Industrial Revolution, the Era of National Unification, the Age of “Progress”, Imperialism, World War I, World War II, the Immediate Post-war Era, the Era of European Unification, and Globalization.

Economics

This course explores Economics as the science of choice. People make countless decisions every day, and economics attempts to explain the reasoning behind these decisions through the perspective of individuals, firms, as well as the government. Complex concepts such as supply and demand, price controls, profitability, and government regulation in terms of understandable real-world situations will be addressed.

AP Microeconomics

This is a rigorous college-level course introducing students to fundamental economic principles as they apply to small economic systems, such as individual businesses and firms. There is a major emphasis on understanding supply and demand, details and models of the major different types of market structures, and how the government plays a role in the functioning of markets. The course will begin with basic economic concepts and move to: the functions and operations of the free market economies; the market system; product and resource markets; government activities and the effects on market mechanisms; types of firms and their market functions; and, international economics and the world economy. Students must be comfortable with graphing concepts, as much of the instruction and analysis will be based on graphs.

AP Macroeconomics

This is a rigorous college-level course to introduce students to fundamental economic principles as they apply to large economic systems. There is a strong emphasis on understanding national income and price levels and gaining familiarity with common financial systems. Students will study basic economic concepts, the operation of national economies and economic tools used to measure economic performance, economic policies impacting national outputs and price levels, and government policies affecting national economies.

World History Sheltered

This class is designed to cover the same curriculum as other World History classes, but it utilizes techniques specially designed to help English Language Learners. Students of World History study major turning points that shaped the modern world. Starting with a short review of crucial events leading to the Enlightenment, the course then focuses from the late eighteenth century of Absolutism and Revolution through the present including the Russian Revolution, two World Wars, Cold War, the decolonization of Africa and the shaping of the world as we know today. Students trace the rise of political ideas and develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international relations. Students develop an understanding of current world issues and relate them to their historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Students consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives. As we see history unfold, students will learn about God’s sovereignty over all of history.

U.S. History Sheltered

This class is designed to cover the same curriculum as other U.S. History classes, but it utilizes techniques specially designed to help English Language Learners. This course is a survey of United States history from Early America with the arrival of early Native Americans to present-day events and movements. The class concurrently aims to realize God’s sovereign hand and providence throughout the course of U.S. history. From revolution to globalization, depression to unprecedented economic prosperity, the history of the United States is one example among many of God’s wisdom, power and control. Examinations of political institutions and behavior, public policy, social and economic change, diplomacy and international relations, and cultural and intellectual development will occur during the year-long instruction.